Answering the Door

Answering the Door - Seeing the Northern Lights

Answering the Door

This column was given birth in the Fall/Winter 2013/2014 issue.

Thank you for your letters--, emails, and phone calls. Your beautiful words and prayers touch me deeply.

Article by Helen Longest-Saccone, Editor-in-Chief

Photography by Marty Saccone, Editor

Seeing the Northern Lights

by Marty Saccone

It caught my attention on the radio early this past September that intensive solar flare activity was occurring on the sun at that time. Reports were that the radiational energy field emitted from these solar storm activities could possibly cause disruptions on earth to various radio communication systems as it neared and interacted with the earth’s magnetic field. I was somewhat familiar with this phenomenon from similar occurrences that have occurred in the past.

However, what really caught my attention was the information that followed.

 

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Aurora borealis (the northern lights), Quoddy Head State Park, Lubec, Maine, by Marty Saccone. Nikon D800E, Nikkor 24mm F2.8 lens, f/4 at 20 seconds, matrix metering mode, manual exposure mode, ISO equivalent 1100, Manfrotto tripod.

 

There was a very high likelihood for sighting the Northern Lights and seeing aurora activity. The northern hemisphere would provide excellent vantage points, particularly at locations that have low levels of light pollution. My own backyard in east Maine provides remote, dark, and spacious skies for viewing the Northern Lights. It was a perfect photo opportunity to try something new, and I was psyched.

Conditions were forecasted to be best on the evening of September 12th.

I did a little research, noting sky conditions, moon phase, and time of moonrise.

Predictions were for clear skies but with a near full moon rising at 8:13 p.m. Hum, “bad news” I thought, full moon, too much visible light to see anything. I was up for giving it a try anyway, figuring I could do a bit of astro photography or moonscape images if nothing materialized.

Arriving early that night, I occupied myself with shooting some dusk images until darkness set in. A high tree line obscured the direction of the oncoming moonrise. The stars were like jewels on a black velvet backdrop, beautiful. I saw no hint of the Northern Lights or aurora though.

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Answering the Door 1

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In early 2013, like so many people before me, I again answered the knock at my heart’s door—a knocking that had been persistent for 40+ years.

 

 

 

 

 

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Answering the Door 2

Answering-the-door2-tnAnswering the door in 2013 to Christ’s knock and praying with faith for His mercy and forgiveness has given me hope and the opportunity to experience a new level of love, joy, and light. Staying on the path in this journey can be challenging even though the destination is rewarding beyond my human ability to grasp all that heaven promises. There are many guides pointing the way; however, there are also stumbling blocks and temptations that can hinder my journey.

 

 

 

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Answering the Door 3

Article by Helen Longest-Saccone, Editor-in-Chief

Photography by Marty Saccone, Editor

Peace is a state of being I have hoped for, spoken about, dreamed about and wished for—for the entire world as well as for myself. Many people have told me that it will never exist—that there is too much evil in the world. Their viewpoints never discouraged me from believing in its possibility and searching for peace. Yet, search as I may peace did not seem to materialize on a frequent basis—instead too often there was fear even thought I knew that faith and love were the answers.

I stopped reading the news because I felt that the daily input of so much negativity into my psyche was not positive for me. Giving up the news made life better, but fear still crept in along with other negative emotions.

 

Sum14-Ansering-the-Door-Photo-No
Backlit spruce fir atop granite cliffs silhouetted by the morning sun, Quoddy Head State Park, Lubec, Maine, by Marty Saccone. Nikon D800E, Nikkor 24mm F2.8 lens, f/16 at 1/125 second, matrix metering mode, manual exposure mode, ISO equivalent 200, Manfrotto tripod. The trees are casting long shadows over lush new shrub growth amidst relic skeletal tree remnants. MS

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